Audio in the Time of Instagram

Audio in the Time of Instagram

I'm worried about audio. 

Social media has placed a premium on beautiful images, leaving audio in the muted, autoplay cold. 

Thats why I'm so happy The Washington Post is using audio in interesting ways on Instagram. They visited former New Orleans residents to see how they have cooped and changed since Katrina 10 years later. 

They utilize the video option to bring human voice front and center. Instead of displaying an audio slideshow, they opt instead for one gorgeous black-and-white portrait. The punch, so rare to find in our social networks, is in the audio. 

The journalism and platforms don't always play perfectly, however. It's difficult to appreciate Jock Pierna's portrait with a large play button hovering most of his face. (Of course it disappears when a user taps the screen.) 

Walking on Adobe Bricks

Walking on Adobe Bricks

Rafa Esparza explores the Getty in his spacesuit. He travels through the museum only by stepping on the adobe bricks he made with his family in the Los Angeles river. The three-hour performance took Esparza from the museum courtyard to the East end. 

My Father's Black Sombrero

My Father's Black Sombrero

My dad doesn't wear his traditional sombreros anymore. Maybe he's done thinking of Zacatecas, Mexico, where he would wear them all the time. But I noticed he pulled out a new, sleek black one for my cousin's wedding today. 

The Local Newspaper That Helped Shape a Chicano Identity

The Local Newspaper That Helped Shape a Chicano Identity

When Luis C. Garza came to Los Angeles from New York, he had spent time as an apprentice to a commercial photographer. Then he joined La Raza newspaper, a small publication that started in the basement of an Episcopalian church in Lincoln Heights. That’s when his education really began.